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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,246 (some duplicates have been removed)
centered on peace commemorating the 50t 50th anniversary of martin luther king's march on washington. is there any way we could be firing rockets at syria before he delivers that speech? >> i seriously doubt that number one for the optics, number two, the u.n. in texters are on the ground. we expect the administration to release a case publicly that gets away from the circumstance case that you and i are talking about and present a more factual case, specific examples of how the assad regime went forward with this. that's what we're expecting. i don't expect this to happen today while the president is speaking, although it is a much anticipated speech, the 50t 50th affords of the "i have a dream" speech that culminated with the march on washington 50 years ago. >> thank you so much, live from washington. >> the iranian stream leader says intervention in syria by the u.s. would be a "disaster." david jackson is on the ground in lebanon. thank you for joining us. what's the reaction in the middle east to the supreme leader's statement this morning? >> morgan, across the board, it's all
in washington, tonight on "washington week." more red lines crossed in syria. >> what we've seen indicates big eventis clearly a of grave concern. when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and, again, we're still gathering our information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> there's no reason, if there's hide, for the regime not to let the investigative team in. gwen: more tough choices in egypt. >> what we're doing right now is theg a full evaluation of u.s.-egyptian relationship. >> we have the same objective. to see a democratic system in place in egypt. it ahn mccain and i called coup because that's exactly what it is. gwen: and new disclosures about ofernment surveillance american citizens. >> i think that the trust of the american people in their at staket is what's here. gwen: a trio of late summer dilemmas, plus -- 50 year later, we look back at the march may have changed america. gjelten the week, tom of npr, alexis simendinger of real clear politics and michael fletcher of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, coveri
sort out the details tonight on "washington week." who's listening in? >> i want to make clear. once again. that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. gwen: how dangerous is al qaeda? >> this is an ongoing process. we are not going to completely eliminate terrorism. gwen: how frosty are things with russia? >> i think there's always been some tension in the u.s.-russian relationship after the fall of the soviet union. gwen: and how frosty are things with congress? >> we're not in a normal atmosphere around here when it comes to "obamacare." gwen: these issues and more will follow the president as he leaves on vacation. we take a look with doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." martha raddatz of abc news. and alexis simendinger of realclearpolitics. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest
washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
in washington. it was an absolute shock. >> this week on "inside washington" -- the shocker, "the washington post" sold. another victim of the changing media universe. >> i do not subscribe to anything anymore. i read everything online. >> president obama cancels a summit with vladimir putin. >> there have been times they slide back into cold war thinking. >> a terror threat closes u.s. embassies. >> this group is fairly ingenious, bold and eager to cause damage. >> the president targets fannie mae and freddie mac. also, hillary, the documentary, the miniseries, and reince priebus, the angry chairman. >> i will not expose our candidates to this kind of treatment. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> the name of the program is "inside washington" and if there is a bigger story in washington than the sale of "the washington post," i cannot think of one. we have colby king, lois romano, a "the washington post" veteran. charles krauthammer.part of the "washington post" writers group. i came to washington to work for broadcast properties, which were owned by "the w
at the "washington post." and no one knows what's in store next. jeff bezos pays $250 million and takes over the news operation that took down a president. but can the guy who gave us the kindle give the news business a much-needed boost? >>> a new sports network is here, fox sports 1, with live sports like major league baseball. >> unbelievable! >> college football. ufc, college basketball, nascar and more. >> yes, espn has a new arch rival, thanks to rupert murdoch. we'll talk to the head of espn about how he plans to keep fox from scoring. >>> jon stewart still not here in a huge deal. he's actually being taken over by amazon ceo jeff bezos. >> and it's the biggest battle for late-night since leno and letterman or leno and conan. maybe jimmy and jimmy. now it's jon versus john. just a few weeks left in jon stewart's summer hiatus. i wonder if john oliver will find it difficult to hand back "the daily show." i'm brian stelter, and this is "reliable sources." >>> welcome to washington. what a head-spinning week it's been to the reporters in this town. for 80 years "the washington post" was synonymou
? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know more about what the national security agency is doing because there are a growing number of people in the congress who are wondering is the n.s.a. infringing on americans' right to privacy? what do you think-
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
to this country. have done great damage to the american culture. to the american psyche. >> washington doesn't want to find a -- 1/6 of the economy is gone. the government took it. i don't think the rest of the world is enamored with obama. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh on the record. and you hear rush say things you never heard him say before. but first, in our one-on-one interview, rush limbaugh tells us what he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals, president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you thinkhe says they're phony? because he believes it or is there a strategy? >> there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama i playfully call it the regime as i know it irritates him. it is much like a regime. i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy. have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
. two firefighters and one civilian have been injured in those fires. >>> turning to washington and the snub heard around the world. president obama abruptly canceling next month's planned meet with russian president vladimir putin. while it's not a complete return to the cold war, there is a chill in the air between the u.s. and russia. nbc's trace iie potts joins me m washington. the president's snub has many wondering, what happens now? >> reporter: next, betty, we wait to see what russia's response is. we'll have two officials right here in washington tomorrow. we'll monitor that for you. here on capitol hill, democrats and republicans are supporting the president's decision. >> and the first impression they get -- >> reporter: secretary of state john kerry and defense secretary chuck hagel are still set to meet their russian counterparts in washington tomorrow. even though president obama canceled his moscow summit with russian president vladimir putin. >> we were not at the point in our progress on a number of these issues where a summit at the presidential level was the m
the march on washington, looking back and remembering both the dream and the dreamer. >> and the army doctor turned killer, a jury decides whether he lives or if he dies. >> the syrian government now calling on the u.n. to investigate chemical weapons on syrian army soldiers. syrian ambassadors gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention there. meanwhile u.n. chemical inspectors continue their investigation into the august 21st attack i in a suburb of damascus. prime minister david cameron calling for meetings. >>> joining us now for the latest diplomat i can updates. do we now know what was on the draft resolution on the part of the british government? >> we don't. no one is leaking over this. normally there are a few leaks, but on this occasion we really don't know what is in this document. to be clear there was a meeting in the side room involving the five permanent security council. the united kingdom, the united states, france, russia, and china. there was also a meeting taking place, and i it's still going on at the u.n. involving haiti. after either of those meeti
on a dime. >> three to one, john. >>> issue 2. bezos goes postal. sold, the washington post, by a billionaire, jeff bezos. the founder of amazon.com. price? $250 million out of bezos's own pocket. the washington post newspapers has been owned by the same family, the grahams, for eight decade. the post is loss known for its reportage of the watergate break-in that led to the resignation of richard nixon. this was the golden age for the post. but now, in the digital age, with news content gravitating to the internet, the post has struggled, like all print media. donald graham described how revenues declined. seven years in a row, with the newspaper suffering a $54 million operating loss last year. that's $54 million. circulation of the paid print edition plunged from $786,000 in 2002, eleven years ago, to $481,000 in 2012. rather than attempt more cost cutting, says mr. graham, he decided to sell. mr. bezos, age 49, is one of the world's richest people, with an estimated worth billions. he sells streaming video online over amazon prime and he introduced the amazon kindle. bezo
his vacation from the war room inside the war room and from washington, we also have mother jones magazine dark money reporter andy krohl. is this kind of hinge illegal, unethical, is it just a coincidence, bad judgment on booker's part, a combination of all of it. when i read this story, i thought that it was one of the most corrupt schemes to deliver personal money to a u.s. senate candidate that i've seen in a long time. what do you think? volunteer well, i think it raises a whole bunch of red flags about cory booker, and about how he interacts with the people who, you know, both people that he, who's interests he could be legislating or deciding on if he does become -- does he does go to congress, and also just issues about who funds his campaign. there are so may be murky overlaps here and ethical trip wires, if you will, about this whole, you know, you tube wanna-be venture that he is a part of. you also saw that the john of jeff zuker, the head of cnn, his 14-year-old son was on the board and had stock options for this company, as well. now i see the news coming out later t
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour h been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> an
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
years ago today, martin luther king junior delivered his legendary dream speech in washington. it was a battle cry for liberty and justice for all. it changed the course of our history. king would have been 84 years old had he lived to this day. he would have been able to witness the nation's first african-american president standing on those same steps he did in 1963. here is president obama commemorating dr. king's dream and his lasting legacy this afternoon. >> on a hot summer day they assembled here in our nation's capital under the shadow of the great emancipator. everyone that realizes what those glorious patriots knew on that day that change does not come from washington but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship, you are marching. that's the lesson of our past. that's the promise of tomorrow. >> okay, bob, you were particularly moved by this speech as you were by dr. king's speech so many years, 50 years ago. >> yeah. i think if dr. king had been alive today, listened to these tributes,
. washington doesn't want to find the waste and fraud. 1/6 of the economy is gone. government just took it. i don't think that the rest of the world is enommored of obama. if you read the foreign press, you get the truth. i love radio. radio is the single greatest opportunity i have to be who i am. >> rush limbaugh oont road and you hear rush say things he's never said before but first in our one-on-one interview rush limbaugh tells what is he thinks of president obama's phony scandal campaign. >> let me ask you, talking about the scandals. president obama says the scandals are phony. why do you think he says they are phony, because he believes it, or is there a strategy? >> no, there's a strategy. i've been troubled by something with the obama, you know, i playfully call it the regime, because i know it irritates them, and it is. it's like a regime, and i've been troubled, i've been amazed. here is a man whose policies have done great damage to this country. policies have done great damage to the economy, have done great damage to the american culture, to the american psyche. i mean, there i
on an airline in honolulu and flew to washington, d.c., and lands at dulles and actually gets an audience, let's say, peter king, or dianne feinstein. how do we think he would have been received if he had a private audience? we have seen how they reacted, they spin the truth, he would have been buried and we would have never known the truth. >> i know you haven't been in direct contact with your son, but what do you know about his condition right now? >> i'll say that having spoken with his russian attorney, he said he's safe. he obviously is exhausted. but he's now needing a period of time where he can recoup his energy level and reflect on what he wishes to do going forward. that's from his attorney. we hope to meet with him very soon, with edward in the next weeks. >> good luck. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and the chairs of the foreign affairs committee, robert menendez, democrat, and republican congressman ed royce, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. senator, let me begin with you, you heard this from lon snowden, and his attorney, they don't believe that ed
on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ballistic missiles into
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be prepared more than ever. to take steps if the president deems it necessary. we go live to washington for more on this. >> reporter: hi, greg. the navy has sent a fourth warship armed with ball
want a friend in washington, get a dog. president obama did so this week with the addition of sunny, another portuguese water dog, companion to bo and one of the few bright spots in the dog days of summer. joining me today, correspondent for "the guardian" anna marie cox and former director of speech writing for the president -- i can't get the words out, i'm so excited, columnist for the daily beast and co-founder of fenway strategies, jon favreau and "washington post" columnist and msnbc political columnist eugene robinson. joining us now is chuck todd who is also, of course, host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." before we get into the actual policy here, i want to talk about the sort of bird's-eye view as far as what the president is doing on this great middle class tour if you will. to me it seems like he's trying to build up as much political capital as possible before he gets back to washington. what do you think he's trying to do? >> i think he's trying to talk about what people around kitchen tables are talking about, right? this has been the great disconnect of washington, s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,246 (some duplicates have been removed)